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Favorite Books

September 27, 2007

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Here is a list of books I would recommend. I need to do more reading, but here is a simple list I’ve devised thus far of what has benefited me as a Christian.

‘Counted Righteous in Christ’ by John Piper

Piper explains the crucial importance of the doctrine of justification. His biblical exegisis is sound in showing that believers are not saved by faith so that salvation is easily attanable, but that God uses faith… to save us. This is because of His own grace and for His own glory. Many Protestants and modern evangelical Christians are confused about why we are saved by faith, and to what extent God anticipates a response from us for salvation. But God anticipates no response from us, but saves us anyways because He is good. The church at large could bennefit from understanding this truth, and be much more humbled by and faithful to the gospel. That is if they realized they have contributed no emotional, mental, or physical cooperation to move God to save them. Their salvation was secured through Christ’s atoning work, apart from themselves, and is made known to them by their faith on behalf of the Spirit’s regenerating work in the soul.

‘The Law and the Gospel’ by Earnest Reisinger

This book has dramatically corrected the way I view the gospel. It has changed the way I view the law and grace. In summary, we are saved from the just penalty of the law (with God as the offended Judge) by grace in order to come back to the law and uphold it (unto our delight and God being more deeply known). The law was given so that grace would be sought, and grace was given so that the law could be upheld.

‘The Sovereign Grace of God’ by James R. White

This has revealed more clearly to me the gospel of scripture. This book walks through the 5 points of TULIP. I believe these points are not necessarily important to believe the gospel, but they are crucial in fully clarifying the gospel.

‘The Mortification of Sin’ by John Owen

As a male, like all other males, who struggles with lust, I recommend this book which gets to the root of the sinful human soul. It also sheds light on the heart of the issue and offers hope in a Christ glorifying Holy Spirit enabled way. Who other than the great Puritan John Owen could pen such words as in this easy read. I also recommend this book for any Christian who seeks to know how to walk in closer dependency upon the Spirit with sin bent wills.

‘The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination’ by Lorraine Boettner

This book was written by the masterfully articulate theologian of the early 20th century, Lorraine Boettner. For anyone who is questioning difficult doctrines such as predestination, total depravity, and limited (definite) atonement, I highly suggest this book.

‘Saved from What?’ by R.C. Sproul

In this book, R.C. Sproul answers for us what it ultimately means to be “saved”. Namely, he takes us on the journey of ‘Whom’ we are saved from. In this simple masterpiece, Sproul upholds a foundational pillar to the gospel message. We are not merely saved from a place, Hell, but are saved from the greatest human predicament imaginable, the eternal fury of an angry God.

‘The Grand Inquisitor’ by Fyodor Dostoevsky

This short read is chapter 5 of the The Brothers Karamazov. It is commonly known as the best chapter of the book. Perhaps someday I will get around to reading the entire book. It richly covers so many topics. You’ll just have to read it!

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3 comments

  1. Well, I have read three of these so far and and on the forth “Law and The Gospel”. All of these books are well worth having in your library. I will never read another book that Cameron doesn’t suggest!


  2. Glad to see The Mortification of Sin by John Owen on here. That book continues to help in my daily battles with sin as well. It saddens me that so many people only read ‘New’ books. Many of these theologically light ‘New’ books try to heal our deep gashes and mortal wounds with pithy encouragements to just be positive and do good and try to be a better person. I confess I was once a ‘New only: no dead guys because they are irrelevant reader.’ Thanks to God’s grace working through the recommendations of brothers my shelf is now full of the likes of Calvin, Owen, Spurgeon, and Edwards and I can’t get enough of them for precisely the same reason I gave for not touching them in the first place. These theological heavyweights penned books that pierce right to the heart of issues people face today in a way that makes many New books seem out of touch.


  3. Yeah, I hear ya Gary. Most of the ODG’s (old dead guys) have done all the laboring for us. But instead of giving them the credit, we want the credit with our fansy new revelations. If I know a thing or two, it’s only because I’m sitting on the shoulders of giants. This is true!



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